Home

Amateur radio like you've never experienced.

A hundred years ago – long before computers, tablets, cell phones, the Internet, wifi, or other communications technologies existed – Amateur Radio operators (hams) were talking with each other across town and around the world.

Hams today use a variety of the latest technologies to communicate wirelessly by Morse code, voice, and computer – completely independent of any commercial infrastructure such as telephone lines or cell towers.

Once you have the radio it is all free. There are no subscriptions or connection charges; and unlike cell phones, ipads, and wifi, you can do it from anywhere. You can get started for around $100, and for less than the cost of a good computer, you can have a complete Amateur Radio station that allows you to communicate with other hams around town or thousands of miles away – literally around the world when radio wave propagation is right.

Amateur Radio is the most powerful and versatile personal communications available to anyone who makes the effort to get a license.

There are many aspects to Amateur Radio. Aside from being just plain fun, it provides you with the ability to communicate in an emergency or from a remote location when telephones, cell phones, the Internet are not available. It is an excellent way to learn about math, science, and technology and can help you on the way to an exciting and well-paying engineering and technical career. You will be able to have very interesting conversations with people from all over the world, in a way that is very different from the telephone or Internet instant messaging, chat rooms, and social networking sites.

We encourage anyone interested in technology and/or in talking with people in different places to explore Amateur radio. At any given time, depending on radio propagation and other factors, we may make contacts with stations around the world. The “magic” of ham radio is that we can do this without relying on telephone lines, cell towers, the Internet, or anything else.

You do need a license to transmit on Amateur Radio frequencies by yourself, however you do not need a license to get on the air under the supervision of a licensed operator.

Latest News

May 30, 2019

WARA meets with the NTRC.

This content is restricted to association members only. If you are a member, please log in. New members may register…
Read More
FACEBOOK FEED ["error","Error validating access token: The session has been invalidated because the user changed their password or Facebook has changed the session for security reasons."]
5 months ago

Amateur radio in action. Members of WARA fabricating and installing a new repeater site in Glasgow, in the heights of Fond Cole. Recycled materials are used in the fabrication of a repeater site ... See more

Amateur radio in action. Members of WARA fabricating and installing a new repeater site in Glasgow, in the heights of Fond Cole. Recycled materials are used in the fabrication of a repeater site ... See more

5 months ago

Excellent video explaining what is amateur radio. What makes it even greater is that WARA's J73RJ is highlighted at the 1:52 mark. Clem James Hilkiah Lavinier

An overview of all the facets of what amateur radio has to offer.

5 months ago

Digital communication in disaster situations is the way for the future and WARA is taking the first step towards making this a reality in Dominica.

WARA launches a weekly Narrow Band Emergency ... See more

WARA will be beginning a weekly NBEMS net on its 2m and 70cm repeater frequencies of 444.7 and 146.56 MHz on Saturday, June 15, 2019, at 8:00 pm local...

5 months ago

6 months ago

Amateur radio in action. Members of WARA fabricating and installing a new repeater site in Glasgow, in the heights of Fond Cole. Recycled materials are used in the fabrication of a repeater site ... See more

Amateur radio in action. Members of WARA fabricating and installing a new repeater site in Glasgow, in the heights of Fond Cole. Recycled materials are used in the fabrication of a repeater site ... See more

6 months ago

Today marks the official beginning of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season. Now may be an opportune time to review your amateur radio operator's emergency preparedness plan.

6 months ago

WARA members visited Mt. Micotrin, a 4000ft tall mountain located in the middle of south-central Dominica. The purpose of this trip was to survey damage caused to the housing and radio communication ... See more

WARA members visited Mt. Micotrin, a 4000ft tall mountain located in the middle of south-central Dominica. The purpose of this trip was to survey damage caused to the housing and radio communication ... See more

6 months ago

WARA currently operates one analog repeater on the frequency of 444.7 plus 5 MHz. CTCSS tone of 103.5 is required to access it, J73RJ installs a cross band repeater 146.560 on Mt. Espagnol.

6 months ago

https://youtu.be/k4dJcK-WVRw

A video describing two of the fascinating aspects of amateur radio, DXing and DXpeditions.

6 months ago

https://youtu.be/avS51gRJ71s

What an amazing radio to have in my hands. The New Yaesu FTDX101D 100 watt HF/6M Direct sampling SDR radio. A beast of a radio. Made a couple contacts today ...

« 1 of 2 »